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Pacesetters: Running with Severe Asthma

Living with severe asthma can often make everyday tasks difficult. Sometimes, you may find yourself out of breath after a short walk. Other times, you may not experience any symptoms at all.

Claire Saunders lives with asthma. She’s also an avid runner who enjoys competing in local races, but like many others living with asthma, she has good days and bad days.

“My mindset when I go for a run is to really just relax because at the end of the day, running, for me, is something to get away from work, to get away from anything else that’s going on in my life,” she says.

Follow her in the videos below as she trains for and runs in the California Watermelon Festival 5K.

It’s important to talk to your doctor and be aware of your symptoms if you’re considering training for a race.

“Before I begin any kind of training schedule, I make sure I consult my doctor to make sure that my schedule is reasonable and my goals are reasonable. And we have an agreement that any time my symptoms act up, I give them a call.”

Claire’s advice for anyone with asthma who wants to run is to listen to your body.

“It’s incredibly important knowing on a run when to actually run and when to stop running. And really just do it for yourself. Don’t necessarily do it to hit a certain mileage goal, or don’t do it to necessarily hit a time goal. Do it because you want to be healthy and you enjoy the feeling of running.”

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